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20121205
20121205
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
lead time. but it's also important to remember that the fiscal cliff isn't only tax rates and spending cuts. the fiscal cliff also includes the nation's agriculture policy, which expires at the end of the year. it includes patches to medicare formulas. patches to social security formulas. so this is a huge mess of issues. we're not even talking about those issues yet. congressional negotiators and the white house aren't talking about these huge host of other issues that are on the table. the thought is if they can get past tax rates and spending cuts, then they will be able to deal with the peripheral issues. but we don't have much time. if a deal isn't reached or a framework isn't reached in the next week or, so it's going to be a big problem. >> all right, thanks for that. good to see you. > >>> nokia -- we'll tell you more when we come back in a few moments. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- ♪ you can stay in and like something... ♪ [ car alarm deactivates ] ♪ ...or you can get out there with your family and actually like something. ♪ the lexus december to rememb
of the fiscal cliff negotiations. the mortgage interest deduction. government spending on this will reach $100 million by 2014, making it the third largest tax break on the books. who does it help? 41 million people. the most recent irs data showed that 41 million people claimed this deduction on their 2010 tax returns. the tax policy center says it tends to benefit upper middle class families the most. these bars show income in the circles the average savings. for those with incomes of less than $40,000 a year, their savings is $91, look at the people who make $250,000 and more. their average savings is about $5500. this benefits people most on both coasts and cities like chicago, with higher property prices, and we watch the fiscal cliff negotiations closely for what could happen next to this tax goody next year. >> here's the question i'm hearing people ask, if we go off the cliff here, how big a hit will we take on taxs? stand by, because i'm about to give you the closest answer i possibly can. to help me with that is laurie montgomery, she is the fiscal policy reporter for the washington
-- the president may secretly want the country to fall off the fiscal cliff. earlier today our hannity cameras caught up with a senator from wisconsin on capitol hill. >> it's increasingly clear to me that the president is very willing to go over the cliff. i think he ought to be spending more time listening and less time lecturing. the president seems to be just fixated on increasing tax rates even though they may hurt the economy and i'm concerned if we go over the cliff, that what we're going to see is unemployment back above 9% and we'll see, you know, a country where we're in a second recession. >> all right. the senator is absolutely right. what we heard from president in recent days amounts to nothing more than con descending lectures. in fact, he sounds like the same hyperpartisan canada that we saw on the campaign trail, you know, the one that worked tire leslie to demonize success. the president appears to have a out right unhealthy fixation on increasing taxes regardless of the consequence and bring on the fiscal cliff. he says who cares if we spiral into another recession. if unemp
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)